Two Bikers Riding All Over The Internet
Buying Your First Motorbike

How To Buy First Motorbike?

Table of Contents

Many of us dreamed of riding a motorbike when we were kids. You might have imagined yourself on the back of a shiny black bike, with cool leather and a funky helmet, seeing yourself as a biker boy or girl, the very epitome of cool. As a youngster, you’ll have thought of bikers as being free and adventurous. You certainly would never have envisaged them on a busy morning commute or standing still in traffic for hours as they tried to get home. Bikes were fast, free and undeniably sexy.

 

For most, these dreams were left behind with childhood. As we age, we develop fears of the open road and assume that we’d be safer in a car. Or, life gets in the way, and we need a vehicle to transport our family. But, for some, that dream of being a biker never disappears. They might spend years driving a safe and reliable family car, but the dream of hitting the open road with two wheels to carry them remains strong. These people spend time looking at bikes online and daydreaming whenever they see a biker on the road. While they might love driving and appreciate all of the benefits a car brings, it will never quicken their pulse the same way a bike would.

 

If you are one of these people, know it is never too late. It’s never too late to buy your first bike. Nor is it too soon (as long as you are over the legal age limit, of course!). Whether you are looking for your first motorized vehicle or have been driving a car for the last 30 years, buying a bike is an option.

 

But, it’s not the same as buying a car – even though many of your considerations will be similar. Here are some of the things that you should look for when buying your first motorbike.

 

Make Safety Your Priority

 

Those childhood dreams probably never considered safety. We’re always safe in our daydreams, even if we enjoy a dangerous storyline. But, in reality, safety should be your priority, just like it would be if you were buying a car. The roads are dangerous places, and while you can’t control all elements, you can control what you drive.

 

If you are buying an old bike, you must get a full service history and have it looked over by a professional before you drive. A newer bike will have undergone the most recent safety checks, but you should still take your time to look at options, find out about safety features, and ensure the bike is in good condition. Often, you can see how well it’s been looked after just by looking at it. Is it dented and damaged? Does the paintwork match? Are the tires in good condition? Are there parts missing?

 

It’s not just the bike that needs consideration, either. Like its rider, you should take the appropriate driver safety training in your location. Even if you’ve passed a test before, it’s worth getting some refresher training if you haven’t been on the road on a bike for a while.

 

Think About the Future

 

An old classic bike can look exceptionally cool, and as long as it’s safe and in good condition, it can be an excellent choice. But you shouldn’t just think about the here and now. If something needed replacing, would the part be readily available and affordable? Or would you be forced to go to a specialist dealer or manufacturer of parts? Of course, if you look after your classic bike, its value will increase, but is it worth it?

 

Modern bikes are often much easier and cheaper to repair. Look here on Bikers Basics for some options, and ask questions if you need to.

 

Consider Usage

 

While a motorbike gives you a great sense of freedom, it’s still a good idea to think about how you will use it the most before making the right purchase, as this will affect what kind of bike you want. Will you mainly ride in cities, on new roads and marked streets? Or will you be riding on rougher terrain? Will you make long journeys or short city trips?

 

Find the Right Fit

 

When looking at bikes, don’t get over-excited by what looks good. When you’ve got a bike, you can’t adjust your seat height or move your steering wheel like in a car. Once you’ve bought it, the height is one that you are stuck with. On short journeys, a bike that’s not quite the right fit might not hurt. But, try taking a long journey on a bike that’s too short or tall, and you’ll find yourself with a bad back and other aches and pains. You might even put yourself and others in danger. So, take the time to think about how a bike fits. Take test drives, and think about your reach and your comfort. Looking for a beginner bike with an upright seating position can be a good idea.

 

Get the Right Gear

 

Buying a bike isn’t all about the bike. You’ll also want a high-quality and safe helmet, leather, or vegan-friendly motorbike gear to keep your head and body safe and well-protected. You might also need to look at add-ons like storage boxes or even trailers if you need them.

 

Don’t Forget the Insurance

 

Buying a bike, like buying a car, comes with other costs. You’ll need to arrange tax and Insurance before you hit the road.

 

Book a Tune-Up

 

If you are buying a second-hand bike, even if it seems in great condition and you’ve taken the time to inspect it, get a second opinion, ask questions and do your research, it’s worth taking it to a professional mechanic for a tune-up and check. It’s always better to be safe when it comes to motorbikes.

daily biker author
Jim D. Smith
Biker and content writer at Daily Bikers Blog. Addicted to Bikes, aviation, fragrances, sushi and tacos.
Share this article
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on telegram
Share on whatsapp
Subscribe for weekly updates
Check Trending Posts
Non-Riders Don’t Get It
Non-Riders Don’t Get It
I had a day in the shed recently, just cleaning up and putting shit in its place plus an oil...
Read More
Diary Of A Haggis Hunters Scotland Part 1
Diary Of A Haggis Hunters Scotland, Part 1
Ooright san? Or something like that. So I’m in Scotland and finally got the rental S1000XR...
Read More
Totally Addicted To Power
Totally Addicted To Power
I’ve been hooked on speed from a young age and I was introduced to it via motorcycles.  ...
Read More